Title
Four Preludes for the Seasons of Worship (Nourse)
Instrumentation
flute
Publisher
Nourse Wind Publications
Grade
3
Product Code
43N050000001

Four Preludes for the Seasons of Worship
for unaccompanied flute
Arranged by Nancy Nourse
Published by Nourse Wind Publications

Contents:
A Lenten Mediation upon Forty Days and Forty Nights - For Lent (Duration: c. 3'05")
Variations on an Old French Carol - For Easter or Christmas (Duration: c. 4')
Meditation upon a Sarum Plainsong - For Advent (Duration: c. 3'05")
Once in Royal David's City (Based upon the hymn tune, Irby by Henry John Gauntlett (1805-1876)) - For Christmas (Duration: c. 2'55)

Performance Notes:
      The four preluedes included in this collection are each based upon a tune associated with a particular time of the church calendar. In the case of the old French carol, its association is with both Easter in its text of "Love is Come Again" and in its Christmas text of "Noel Nouvelet" (or as sung in English, "Sing we now of Christmas").
      The advent prelude, Meditation upon a Sarum Plainsong, uses the 7th century plainsong chant Conditor Alme Siderum as its basis, with frequent trope-like interpolations occuring between the phrases. The lenten prelude, Mediations Upon Forty Days, likewise employs a theme with interpolations approach. The hymn tune, Heilein, is most closely associated with the English text, "Forty days and forty nights, Thou wast fasting in the wild". However in the midst of this piece occur short musical representations of the three temptations. 
      Variations on an Old French Carol was developed with Jacob van Eyck's Der Fluyten Lust-hof (1649) with its many themes and divisions as a model. Even more simply conceived was my rendering of the Victorian Christmas hymn, Once in Royal David's City. Its first verse should be played sweetly and simply, using an innocence that is generally attached to our memories of hearing this sung a cappella by a solo treble from the King's College Cambrige choir. Although harmonic material is added for verses two and three, overall serenity and simplicity should never stray from this prelude.

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